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Doc Wins Int’l Award For Aiding Training To Prevent Eye Morbidity | – Times of India



Mangaluru: An ophthalmologist study on the need to train ICU nursing staff to prevent eye morbidity among patients has won the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons (ESCRS) trainee bursary award.
The study was undertaken by Dr Atul Kamath, ophthalmologist from Yenepoya Medical College and Hospital, Deralakatte. Ophthalmologists from all over the world applied and participated in this conference and this year about 20,000 experts with 15,000 ophthalmologists and 5,000 allied health staff participated, Dr Kamath said.
The study was undertaken along with his wife Dr Aditi Pai, also an ophthalmologist, and under the guidance of Dr Indravan Vasava, assistant professor, Baroda Medical College and Sir SayajiRao Hospital, Vadodara. Dr Kamath told TOI that the study was undertaken during the second wave of the Covid-19, when hospitals were seeing a high rate of ICU admissions and patients were ventilated and comatosed.
“We noticed that most patients started having severe eye problems like Lagophthalmos, which is incomplete closure of the eyelids, due to which patients develop exposure Keratitis, which is the inflammation of the cornea. This is one of the causes of permanent blindness. Patients also developed discharge, watering and redness of eyes. All of these conditions are reversible if detected early and given prompt treatment. But due to the extremely high volume of patients admitted all these eye signs went unnoticed and even after patients recovered they had some amount of eye morbidity,” he said.
Hence, a study was conducted and 20 nursing staff in Vadodara were part of it. They were trained for 30 days on eye care, to understand the danger signs and to inform an ophthalmologist if they saw any of it. “The result was that we immediately saw a 2.5 times improvement and the eye problems were reduced dramatically. The study is relevant and there is a need for a standardised protocol in the world to train nurses to prevent eye morbidity,” Dr Kamath said.
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